Linda Taylor: Honey, I’m always right

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Have you ever been working on something and your spouse comes to you and tells you you’re doing it wrong?

Well, in our house, if my husband tries to tell me I’m doing it wrong, my comeback is, “I know what I’m doing.”

I say this instead of, “Thank you, dear, for your help,” and I become upset with him, thinking he’s trying to tell me what to do.

Now, let’s put the shoe on the other foot.

If I try and suggest (yes, ladies, we only suggest, right?) to him that he is doing it wrong, his comeback is, “I know what I’m doing, quit trying to tell me how to do it.”

Before you know it, we are upset with each other, and here comes the silent treatment.

We’re both thinking that we were just trying to help.

We hate to admit it, but sometimes the advice we’re getting is better than the way we’re doing something. But to admit it, that’s an entirely different thing.

Why is it that we just can’t handle correction? Think about it: when we were children, we just knew that our parents didn’t know what they were talking about until we became parents ourselves.

In the Bible (John 7:50), Nicodemus told the Pharisees that they were wrongly judging Jesus. But, they didn’t want to hear it because admitting they were wrong would make them look bad in the eyes of the people, so they continued living a lie that led to crucifying Jesus, “an innocent man.”

Don’t we do that today?

We seem to think correction is something bad. I look at myself and see the know-it-all attitude at times because that’s admitting I’m doing it wrong.

But, my husband is just trying to help me.

Instead, I’m thinking he’s trying to criticize me. Have you noticed that criticize (meaning to find fault) and crucify (meaning to put to death, to treat cruelly) both start with the letter C?

They had to find fault with Jesus (to achieve this they found false witness), so they put Jesus to death to silence him.

How much different are we today with the people around us? We start to defend ourselves with whatever comes to mind, right or wrong, then we give our spouse the silent treatment just to prove we know what we’re doing, just as the Pharisees put Jesus to death to prove they were right.

What’s so wrong with accepting help? That’s all Jesus wanted to do, give us the help we need through the trials and tribulation we go through each and every day.

So, don’t be so hard on your spouse — they are just trying to make it easier for you. Obeying what Jesus said — to love each other — means accepting advice whether we like it or not. Only you can decide to accept advice, help, or not.

It’s up to you.

God bless everyone and have a blessed Easter.

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