Wendy Reynolds stands Thursday in her office at the Bureau of Land Management’s Little Snake Field Office in Craig. Reynolds was hired as the office’s new field manager in December and began work Monday. She has previously lived in Steamboat Springs, and arrives at the Little Snake Field Office after working for the BLM in Idaho.

Photo by Brian Smith

Wendy Reynolds stands Thursday in her office at the Bureau of Land Management’s Little Snake Field Office in Craig. Reynolds was hired as the office’s new field manager in December and began work Monday. She has previously lived in Steamboat Springs, and arrives at the Little Snake Field Office after working for the BLM in Idaho.

Former Northwest Colorado resident returns home to lead local BLM Office

Advertisement

Wendy Reynolds is Colorado girl at heart.

Her roots, she said, are firmly set in Northwest Colorado.

But, she would have grown up a city girl in Denver if it hadn’t been for her father showing her the lands, wilderness and issues she would once make her living in.

“I have to give back to my dad because he loved the outdoors and he took me hunting and fishing very early when I was a little girl,” she said. “It just grew on me and it grew in my heart and it is just part of who I am.”

However, there wasn’t a moment Reynolds realized she wanted to make her living balancing the uses of public lands.

“I think it is just a path I was put on and something I embraced wholeheartedly,” she said. “I’ve really enjoyed the opportunity to make a difference.

“It is awesome when you can look at the vast amounts of public lands, particularly here in this community, and know that you can help that multiple use, resource ethics and also benefit the community.”

Reynolds is the new field manager for the Bureau of Land Management’s Little Snake Field Office. She was hired in late December and began work Monday.

Reynolds has a long history with the BLM and other land agencies.

She has spent 21 years in government and comes to the Little Snake Field Office from the BLM’s Upper Snake Field Office in Idaho. She previously lived several years in the Steamboat Springs area and worked for the National Forest Service in Medicine Bow National Forest.

She started working for the BLM in 2002 at the Little Snake Field Office in Craig as a planning and environmental coordinator, a position she held for a year.

“When you love the country, it is hard not to be passionate about your job and what you do,” she said.

She replaces previous field manager John Husband, who retired and was temporarily replaced by David Blackstun, who served as acting field manager. Blackstun recently took a job with the BLM in Washington, D.C.

Reynolds is charged with managing 1.3 million acres of public lands and 1.1 million acres of subsurface mineral estate in Moffat, Routt and Rio Blanco counties, as well as managing an office of about 30 employees.

As she looked out of her office window Thursday in Craig, she said she feels at home again.

“This part of the country has a real sense of who they are and they hang on to their heritage and it is very clear where you are when you come to this community and the values that this community supports,” she said. “It feels good to me. I fit here because I support a lot of those values.”

Northwest Colorado, she said, has the “best of all the worlds,” from the mountains east to the plains west.

Reynolds said she would make a priority of carefully balancing land uses, such as grazing and energy development, with conservation.

“It is hard to find the balance point, but I know there is one,” she said.

Much the same could be said for Reynolds’ goal of finding a balance between federal BLM direction and local voices.

Local planning efforts, she said, “have to be interfaced with federal decision making.”

“That is one of the things that we are encouraged to do the most is work with our local communities and understand the sense of place (they) have,” she said. “Their feelings about public land management are extremely important to me and balancing that with the (federal) direction can be a bit of a gauntlet.

“But, communication is key (and) listening is key.”

Reynolds said her work takes on extra importance considering the amount of growth, change and various demands locally and across the nation.

“We are on the edge of a lot of change,” she said. “We are looking at a lot more energy development, we are looking at a lot more power line development, we are looking at becoming a self-sustainable nation for energy development. So it’s very important how we make these decisions on managing public land.”

Such decisions can have huge impacts on a community — from its economy to its government. Perhaps those it might affect most are ranchers, farmers and others who depend on public lands for their livelihood, she said.

“That sense of place, customs and cultures in a community are incredibly important for a land manager to understand,” she said.

Reynolds said often times her personality and land management philosophy mix together.

“I think it is my sense of adventure — my wanting to explore unknown territories and to get into controversial issues and explore where we can go with that with good solutions,” she said. “My staff has always laughed at me because I am always such a high-energy person.”

Even with the number of decisions she must face during her tenure in the office, Reynolds thinks she can handle it all, she said.

“I have never had a problem making tough decisions,” she said. “I don’t anticipate having a problem here. I do my homework. I ask my staff.

“I am very well informed before I make a decision and when I make it, it is generally based on very good science, information and a little bit of gut.”

Wendy Reynolds is Colorado girl at heart.

Her roots, she said, are firmly set in Northwest Colorado.

But, she would have grown up a city girl in Denver if it hadn’t been for her father showing her the lands, wilderness and issues she would once make her living in.

“I have to give back to my dad because he loved the outdoors and he took me hunting and fishing very early when I was a little girl,” she said. “It just grew on me and it grew in my heart and it is just part of who I am.”

However, there wasn’t a moment Reynolds realized she wanted to make her living balancing the uses of public lands.

“I think it is just a path I was put on and something I embraced wholeheartedly,” she said. “I’ve really enjoyed the opportunity to make a difference.

“It is awesome when you can look at the vast amounts of public lands, particularly here in this community, and know that you can help that multiple use, resource ethics and also benefit the community.”

Reynolds is the new field manager for the Bureau of Land Management’s Little Snake Field Office. She was hired in late December and began work Monday.

Reynolds has a long history with the BLM and other land agencies.

She has spent 21 years in government and comes to the Little Snake Field Office from the BLM’s Upper Snake Field Office in Idaho. She previously lived several years in the Steamboat Springs area and worked for the National Forest Service in Medicine Bow National Forest.

She started working for the BLM in 2002 at the Little Snake Field Office in Craig as a planning and environmental coordinator, a position she held for a year.

“When you love the country, it is hard not to be passionate about your job and what you do,” she said.

She replaces previous field manager John Husband, who retired and was temporarily replaced by David Blackstun, who served as acting field manager. Blackstun recently took a job with the BLM in Washington, D.C.

Reynolds is charged with managing 1.3 million acres of public lands and 1.1 million acres of subsurface mineral estate in Moffat, Routt and Rio Blanco counties, as well as managing an office of about 30 employees.

As she looked out of her office window Thursday in Craig, she said she feels at home again.

“This part of the country has a real sense of who they are and they hang on to their heritage and it is very clear where you are when you come to this community and the values that this community supports,” she said. “It feels good to me. I fit here because I support a lot of those values.”

Northwest Colorado, she said, has the “best of all the worlds,” from the mountains east to the plains west.

Reynolds said she would make a priority of carefully balancing land uses, such as grazing and energy development, with conservation.

“It is hard to find the balance point, but I know there is one,” she said.

Much the same could be said for Reynolds’ goal of finding a balance between federal BLM direction and local voices.

Local planning efforts, she said, “have to be interfaced with federal decision making.”

“That is one of the things that we are encouraged to do the most is work with our local communities and understand the sense of place (they) have,” she said. “Their feelings about public land management are extremely important to me and balancing that with the (federal) direction can be a bit of a gauntlet.

“But, communication is key (and) listening is key.”

Reynolds said her work takes on extra importance considering the amount of growth, change and various demands locally and across the nation.

“We are on the edge of a lot of change,” she said. “We are looking at a lot more energy development, we are looking at a lot more power line development, we are looking at becoming a self-sustainable nation for energy development. So it’s very important how we make these decisions on managing public land.”

Such decisions can have huge impacts on a community — from its economy to its government. Perhaps those it might affect most are ranchers, farmers and others who depend on public lands for their livelihood, she said.

“That sense of place, customs and cultures in a community are incredibly important for a land manager to understand,” she said.

Reynolds said often times her personality and land management philosophy mix together.

“I think it is my sense of adventure — my wanting to explore unknown territories and to get into controversial issues and explore where we can go with that with good solutions,” she said. “My staff has always laughed at me because I am always such a high-energy person.”

Even with the number of decisions she must face during her tenure in the office, Reynolds thinks she can handle it all, she said.

“I have never had a problem making tough decisions,” she said. “I don’t anticipate having a problem here. I do my homework. I ask my staff.

“I am very well informed before I make a decision and when I make it, it is generally based on very good science, information and a little bit of gut.”

Wendy Reynolds is Colorado girl at heart.

Her roots, she said, are firmly set in Northwest Colorado.

But, she would have grown up a city girl in Denver if it hadn’t been for her father showing her the lands, wilderness and issues she would once make her living in.

“I have to give back to my dad because he loved the outdoors and he took me hunting and fishing very early when I was a little girl,” she said. “It just grew on me and it grew in my heart and it is just part of who I am.”

However, there wasn’t a moment Reynolds realized she wanted to make her living balancing the uses of public lands.

“I think it is just a path I was put on and something I embraced wholeheartedly,” she said. “I’ve really enjoyed the opportunity to make a difference.

“It is awesome when you can look at the vast amounts of public lands, particularly here in this community, and know that you can help that multiple use, resource ethics and also benefit the community.”

Reynolds is the new field manager for the Bureau of Land Management’s Little Snake Field Office. She was hired in late December and began work Monday.

Reynolds has a long history with the BLM and other land agencies.

She has spent 21 years in government and comes to the Little Snake Field Office from the BLM’s Upper Snake Field Office in Idaho. She previously lived several years in the Steamboat Springs area and worked for the National Forest Service in Medicine Bow National Forest.

She started working for the BLM in 2002 at the Little Snake Field Office in Craig as a planning and environmental coordinator, a position she held for a year.

“When you love the country, it is hard not to be passionate about your job and what you do,” she said.

She replaces previous field manager John Husband, who retired and was temporarily replaced by David Blackstun, who served as acting field manager. Blackstun recently took a job with the BLM in Washington, D.C.

Reynolds is charged with managing 1.3 million acres of public lands and 1.1 million acres of subsurface mineral estate in Moffat, Routt and Rio Blanco counties, as well as managing an office of about 30 employees.

As she looked out of her office window Thursday in Craig, she said she feels at home again.

“This part of the country has a real sense of who they are and they hang on to their heritage and it is very clear where you are when you come to this community and the values that this community supports,” she said. “It feels good to me. I fit here because I support a lot of those values.”

Northwest Colorado, she said, has the “best of all the worlds,” from the mountains east to the plains west.

Reynolds said she would make a priority of carefully balancing land uses, such as grazing and energy development, with conservation.

“It is hard to find the balance point, but I know there is one,” she said.

Much the same could be said for Reynolds’ goal of finding a balance between federal BLM direction and local voices.

Local planning efforts, she said, “have to be interfaced with federal decision making.”

“That is one of the things that we are encouraged to do the most is work with our local communities and understand the sense of place (they) have,” she said. “Their feelings about public land management are extremely important to me and balancing that with the (federal) direction can be a bit of a gauntlet.

“But, communication is key (and) listening is key.”

Reynolds said her work takes on extra importance considering the amount of growth, change and various demands locally and across the nation.

“We are on the edge of a lot of change,” she said. “We are looking at a lot more energy development, we are looking at a lot more power line development, we are looking at becoming a self-sustainable nation for energy development. So it’s very important how we make these decisions on managing public land.”

Such decisions can have huge impacts on a community — from its economy to its government. Perhaps those it might affect most are ranchers, farmers and others who depend on public lands for their livelihood, she said.

“That sense of place, customs and cultures in a community are incredibly important for a land manager to understand,” she said.

Reynolds said often times her personality and land management philosophy mix together.

“I think it is my sense of adventure — my wanting to explore unknown territories and to get into controversial issues and explore where we can go with that with good solutions,” she said. “My staff has always laughed at me because I am always such a high-energy person.”

Even with the number of decisions she must face during her tenure in the office, Reynolds thinks she can handle it all, she said.

“I have never had a problem making tough decisions,” she said. “I don’t anticipate having a problem here. I do my homework. I ask my staff.

“I am very well informed before I make a decision and when I make it, it is generally based on very good science, information and a little bit of gut.”

Wendy Reynolds is Colorado girl at heart.

Her roots, she said, are firmly set in Northwest Colorado.

But, she would have grown up a city girl in Denver if it hadn’t been for her father showing her the lands, wilderness and issues she would once make her living in.

“I have to give back to my dad because he loved the outdoors and he took me hunting and fishing very early when I was a little girl,” she said. “It just grew on me and it grew in my heart and it is just part of who I am.”

However, there wasn’t a moment Reynolds realized she wanted to make her living balancing the uses of public lands.

“I think it is just a path I was put on and something I embraced wholeheartedly,” she said. “I’ve really enjoyed the opportunity to make a difference.

“It is awesome when you can look at the vast amounts of public lands, particularly here in this community, and know that you can help that multiple use, resource ethics and also benefit the community.”

Reynolds is the new field manager for the Bureau of Land Management’s Little Snake Field Office. She was hired in late December and began work Monday.

Reynolds has a long history with the BLM and other land agencies.

She has spent 21 years in government and comes to the Little Snake Field Office from the BLM’s Upper Snake Field Office in Idaho. She previously lived several years in the Steamboat Springs area and worked for the National Forest Service in Medicine Bow National Forest.

She started working for the BLM in 2002 at the Little Snake Field Office in Craig as a planning and environmental coordinator, a position she held for a year.

“When you love the country, it is hard not to be passionate about your job and what you do,” she said.

She replaces previous field manager John Husband, who retired and was temporarily replaced by David Blackstun, who served as acting field manager. Blackstun recently took a job with the BLM in Washington, D.C.

Reynolds is charged with managing 1.3 million acres of public lands and 1.1 million acres of subsurface mineral estate in Moffat, Routt and Rio Blanco counties, as well as managing an office of about 30 employees.

As she looked out of her office window Thursday in Craig, she said she feels at home again.

“This part of the country has a real sense of who they are and they hang on to their heritage and it is very clear where you are when you come to this community and the values that this community supports,” she said. “It feels good to me. I fit here because I support a lot of those values.”

Northwest Colorado, she said, has the “best of all the worlds,” from the mountains east to the plains west.

Reynolds said she would make a priority of carefully balancing land uses, such as grazing and energy development, with conservation.

“It is hard to find the balance point, but I know there is one,” she said.

Much the same could be said for Reynolds’ goal of finding a balance between federal BLM direction and local voices.

Local planning efforts, she said, “have to be interfaced with federal decision making.”

“That is one of the things that we are encouraged to do the most is work with our local communities and understand the sense of place (they) have,” she said. “Their feelings about public land management are extremely important to me and balancing that with the (federal) direction can be a bit of a gauntlet.

“But, communication is key (and) listening is key.”

Reynolds said her work takes on extra importance considering the amount of growth, change and various demands locally and across the nation.

“We are on the edge of a lot of change,” she said. “We are looking at a lot more energy development, we are looking at a lot more power line development, we are looking at becoming a self-sustainable nation for energy development. So it’s very important how we make these decisions on managing public land.”

Such decisions can have huge impacts on a community — from its economy to its government. Perhaps those it might affect most are ranchers, farmers and others who depend on public lands for their livelihood, she said.

“That sense of place, customs and cultures in a community are incredibly important for a land manager to understand,” she said.

Reynolds said often times her personality and land management philosophy mix together.

“I think it is my sense of adventure — my wanting to explore unknown territories and to get into controversial issues and explore where we can go with that with good solutions,” she said. “My staff has always laughed at me because I am always such a high-energy person.”

Even with the number of decisions she must face during her tenure in the office, Reynolds thinks she can handle it all, she said.

“I have never had a problem making tough decisions,” she said. “I don’t anticipate having a problem here. I do my homework. I ask my staff.

“I am very well informed before I make a decision and when I make it, it is generally based on very good science, information and a little bit of gut.”

Click here to have the print version of the Craig Daily Press delivered to your home.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.