From left, Moffat County High School seniors Patrick Thompson, Thomas McCoy and Adam Foster stand Thursday in the store run by the high school’s Distributive Education Clubs of America group. They’re among 26 students going to a DECA district competition Sunday and Monday in Aspen, which determines which competitors advance to state.

Photo by Bridget Manley

From left, Moffat County High School seniors Patrick Thompson, Thomas McCoy and Adam Foster stand Thursday in the store run by the high school’s Distributive Education Clubs of America group. They’re among 26 students going to a DECA district competition Sunday and Monday in Aspen, which determines which competitors advance to state.

Weekend DECA competition to determine state contenders

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At a Glance …

Moffat County High School’s Distributive Education Clubs of America group headed to district competition Sunday.

Event results to determine which group members compete at state competition in February.

Teacher: 26 students are participating in districts, which is the “largest DECA team we’ve ever had.”

Quotable

“I’m thrilled with their season so far.”

Krista Schenck

Moffat County High School business, marketing and technology teacher, about the high school’s Distributive Education Clubs of America group

Members of a Moffat County High School competitive marketing and business club will know Monday whether they will advance to the next round of competition.

The MCHS Distributive Education Clubs of America group heads to its district competition Sunday in Aspen.

The two-day event determines which members qualify for state, scheduled for Feb. 26 through 28 in Colorado Springs, said Krista Schenck, MCHS business, marketing and technology teacher.

Twenty-six students are going to the competition, “Which is the largest DECA team we’ve ever had,” she said.

MCHS senior Adam Foster will be among them.

“It’s a pretty stressful weekend because it’s kind of like win or go home, pretty much,” he said.

The competition is divided into two components.

A third of participants’ overall score is determined by a 100-question multiple choice test, Schenck said. The remaining two-thirds hinge on their performance in marketing-related role-plays.

Students can choose from a variety of topics, she said, including food, sports and entertainment.

The team is young but so far, its performance has been encouraging.

“They’re actually doing really well,” Schenck said. “We had not as many seniors as we’ve had in the past, so we’ve got a lot of first-timers this year.”

During an October competition in Glenwood Springs, two students placed in the top five in their event. At an event in Denver later that month, the number jumped to eight, Schenck said.

Unlike school sports or other extracurricular groups, DECA competitions aren’t divided into classes.

MCHS students are often pitted against larger schools, “and their kids have two (or) three years of marketing whereas our kids have, like, one year of marketing,” Schenck said.

“So the fact that we have eight kids that are competing … with the best of the best is good,” she said. “I’m thrilled with their season so far.”

Foster has high hopes for his team.

“I think that our group will do very well at districts and we’ll have a strong representation at state in February,” he said.

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