A blaze lights up the night in this photo provided by the Bureau of Land Management. The Ladore Fire, two miles northwest of the Gates of Ladore in the BLM Diamond Breaks Wilderness Study area, reached 1,072 acres Tuesday.

Bureau of Land Management/Courtesy

A blaze lights up the night in this photo provided by the Bureau of Land Management. The Ladore Fire, two miles northwest of the Gates of Ladore in the BLM Diamond Breaks Wilderness Study area, reached 1,072 acres Tuesday.

Crews contain, monitor fires in and near Moffat County

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The Ladore Fire, two miles northwest of the Gates of Ladore in the Bureau of Land Management Diamond Breaks Wilderness Study area, reached 1,072 acres as of Tuesday, the Northwest Colorado Fire Management Unit reported in a news release.

The fire is being allowed to burn to naturally clear away dead vegetation. The blaze was ignited by lightning at about 5:15 p.m. Friday.

The fire “has remained fairly inactive and (has shown) no additional growth,” according to the release.

The fire was initially estimated to at 320 acres, but a GPS reading obtained a more accurate estimation of the fire’s size, said Lynn Barclay, BLM public information officer, adding that steep, uneven terrain made it difficult to estimate the fire’s size on the ground.

Fire crews responded to two more blazes Tuesday afternoon after a string of other fires sprung up in Moffat, Routt and Rio Blanco counties in recent days.

“Two Moffat County Sheriff’s engines and two Bureau of Land Management engines responded to a wildland fire seven miles north of Maybell,” the release stated. The blaze, known as the Sheep Fire, is on private land, estimated to be about 100 acres in size and is uncontained. The cause had not been determined as of Tuesday afternoon.

An engine crew also responded to the Twentyfour Fire in the Piceance Basin area in Rio Blanco County. The fire, determined to have been caused by lightning, is contained.

Crews also checked on fires that began Monday after more than 5,000 lightning strikes hit Moffat, Rio Blanco, Routt, Jackson and Grand counties Sunday night.

Three fires in Moffat County and one in Rio Blanco County — all estimated at a tenth of an acre — were contained Monday.

The Skillet Fire, located in Routt National Forest, is being allowed to burn for environmental benefits, said Barclay.

No structures are currently threatened and no injuries have been reported in any of the fires.

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