Editorial: How soon we forget

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Craig Editorial Board, Jan. to March 2012

  • Al Cashion, community representative
  • Jeff Pleasant, community representative
  • Bryce Jacobson, newspaper representative
  • Bridget Manley, newspaper representative
  • Chris Nichols, community representative
  • Josh Roberts, newspaper representative

Our View

The loss of young people in our community is always followed by an initial burst of awareness, but that attention soon recedes. That trend needs to change.

While the summer provided some fun and memorable moments for the Craig and Moffat County community, it was not without its share of heartbreak and loss.

Over the summer, our community lost young people to tragic and avoidable circumstances, occurrences that have become all too familiar and ones that irrevocably damage local families.

To them, the hearts of friends, family, neighbors and sometimes even complete strangers in the community go out, and assistance or support is never far away.

That’s perhaps the biggest difference between our community and most others, and one impossible to fully appreciate unless you live here — our community reaches out and looks after its own.

This is reassuring to Editorial Board members, and probably many in the community.

However, the board would be remiss if it didn’t state how regrettable it is that the need exists at all, and how frequently.

Each year, it seems a few people — young, old … the age doesn’t matter — are lost far too soon, taken from us prematurely by fatal decisions or momentary lapses of judgment.

This sort of moment is not rare — after all, who among us hasn’t made decisions that only luck dumb luck prevented from turning into something with irreversible consequences?

It seems that whenever young people are involved, the awareness is magnified, but soon forgotten.

This needs to change.

Young people often feel that they’re bulletproof and invincible, indestructible and untouchable. What has happened to someone else won’t happen to them.

Call it a misconception of youth.

They don’t realize how soon it can all be lost, how quickly the promise of their future can be taken away.

All it takes is one bad decision, a split-second of lapsed thinking.

Editorial Board members contend it is left to everyday residents to carry the awareness and pass it on routinely to their children and, if needed, other people’s children, as well.

Here’s hoping that they pay heed.

It is truly tragic that we have lost as many young people in our community as we have. Their role today, regrettably, stands as being a reminder of what can potentially happen.

They are our teachers. Now, it’s up to everyone to listen.

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