Craig City council examines river erosion

In other action, the Craig City Council:

• Approved, 7-0, meeting minutes from May 25.

• Approved, 7-0, renewal of the 3.2 percent beer retail liquor license for Loaf ‘N Jug, 2441 W. Victory Way.

• Approved, 7-0, renewal the retail liquor store license for Lariat Liquor, 391 Lincoln Street.

• Approved, 7-0, ordinance No. 1005 for the regulation of traffic amending the Craig municipal code and adopting the 2010 edition of the “Model Traffic Code for Colorado Municipalities” with the exception of Section 1409. First reading.

• Approved, 7-0, resolution No. 8 to adopt a red flag policy and identity theft prevention program as required by the Fair and Accurate Credit Transitions Act of 2003.

• Heard a police department report for the month of May.

• Heard presentations from Randy Looper and Tammie Thompson-Booker who are in opposing the percentage amount of the proposed Craig lodging tax.

Craig resident Jackie Crider said the flow of Fortification Creek has been eroding her back yard of her home for years.

But, this year “it is just really bad,” she said.

Crider, who lives in the 800 block of Washington Street, spoke to the Craig City Council Tuesday in hopes the city would help her take measures to curb and prevent the erosion caused by the creek to her property.

Craig Public Works Director Bill Earley said the problem stems from a redirection of the creek’s water flow.

Earley said he thinks the culprit may be fallen debris from the other side of the creek bank that has blocked the creek’s flow, forcing the water into Crider’s property.

Earley said he was contacted by Crider about the problem last year, but heavy spring snow melt run-off worsened the erosion at Crider’s home this year.

Crider said she had to remove a section of the fencing that borders the creek to prevent it from falling in.

“Now, with the fence down, I’m scared to let me kids play out in the yard because I am scared the are going to fall in,” she said.

Earley said there could be two solutions to the problem — dig the debris out of the creek or enforce the eroded banks with concrete rip rap or other materials.

Craig Mayor Don Jones said the city could not help Crider with the situation because of the precedence the issue sets.

“I guess the only trouble we would have, once we start one private (residence) we may as well go up and down both sides of the creek,” he said. “We can’t afford it as a city.”

Earley said he was hesitant to have the city do the work because it was on private property.

“I’ve got all these contractors that are hungry right now,” he said. “They want work and if I go in there and do it, then I am taking work away from the private sector. We try not to do that.”

Jones suggested that Crider use free concrete rip rap provided by either by the city or other local excavation businesses to reinforce the banks, or hire a private excavation crew to use a back hoe to dig the debris redirecting the flow of the creek.

Jones said there are about 40 Craig residences that back up to the creek and said “mother nature” could be at fault for the problem.

“That may have been where the creek ran 50 years ago,” he said. “Who knows? Once we do that, that sets precedence and how do you say no to the next person? You can’t.”

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