Ronald and Marie Kettle’s paint horse, Rolex Bar Twister, competed in the steer tie-down roping event June 28 to July 3 at the 2010 Summer World Championship Paint Horse Show. Rolex won the World Championship title in the event.

Melissa Mathies/Courtesy

Ronald and Marie Kettle’s paint horse, Rolex Bar Twister, competed in the steer tie-down roping event June 28 to July 3 at the 2010 Summer World Championship Paint Horse Show. Rolex won the World Championship title in the event.

Craig couple’s horse wins championship title

Advertisement

photo

Melissa Mathies/Courtesy

Rolex Bar Twister, a 5-year-old stallion, was raised from birth until he was 3 years old on the Kettle’s land outside of Craig. At that time, Rolex was moved to Penrose to be trained as a performance horse.

Growing up on a ranch, Craig resident Ronald Kettle was always around horses. He said he had one goal in mind — raising a performance horse.

“I always had a dream to raise a paint horse,” he said. “Then, one day, my friend went to a show and I found one that I was drawn to.”

Years after he got his first horse, Kettle and his wife, Marie, raised Rolex Bar Twister, a 5-year-old paint horse, on their property east of Craig.

When the tobiano horse turned 3, Kettle said it was time for him to go to a ranch with a trainer.

“We took the horse up to Penrose to get trained,” Kettle said. “The trainer at the time trained the horse in a lot of the roping events to start him off.”

From June 23 to July 3, Rolex got to show off his skills.

With new trainer Jack Wright, Rolex competed at the 2010 Summer World Championship Paint Horse Show, an American Paint Horse Association offering, in Fort Worth, Texas.

More than 600 horses from around the world competed at the show, Kettle said.

After competing in six events, Rolex was able to take home the world championship title in junior tie-down roping.

Rolex, the colt of a former

American Paint Horse Association horse, has done well in his other events, including heading, heeling and steer stopping.

But, the show in Fort Worth was his first big appearance in tie-down roping, Kettle added.

“When we switched to (Wright) as the trainer, we were looking to add a few events,” he said. “(Rolex) just learned tie-down roping this past spring.”

Rolex isn’t the first horse the Kettles have tried to shape into a winner, he said.

“When I bought my first paint horse with my buddy, I was looking to start preparing that horse,” Kettle said. “We had only about four horses when we started raising them for performances.”

One of the four was Rolex’s mother.

When Kettle found the right stallion to breed her with, Kettle said he knew would have a good horse.

“It took a lot of time and a lot of patience to get a horse ready,” he said. “But, (Rolex) had a lot of brains and was a smart horse.”

Now that Rolex isn’t on Kettle’s land, he doesn’t get to see the horse other than when he competes.

Kettle said he and his wife try to attend many of the shows Rolex competes in, but he has a lot of trust in Wright to make sure the horse is doing well.

“Sometimes, I feel I should go up to (Penrose) to help,” he said. “But, I pay (Wright) to train him, and I trust him 100 percent.”

Rolex will have time to rest before his next event, scheduled for September in Loveland.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.