James Merett: Symbolism of obelisk

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To the editor:

In this letter, I will write about the building in Washington, D.C.

In 1793, when George Washington sanctioned the laying of the capitol building’s cornerstone, he did so wearing a Masonic apron emblazoned with the brotherhood’s symbols.

Athena, a Pagan God stands atop the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

As you enter this nation’s capitol building, you see the Pagan God Mars enshrined in all his glory.

The Apotheosis of Washing­ton is the very large fresco painting covering the inside of the dome. The fresco depicts George Washington becoming a god surrounded by figures from classical mythology.

Surrounding Washington, the two goddesses and the 13 maidens, are six scenes lining the perimeter, each representing a national concept allegorically.

The first scene depicts a woman — Freedom, also known as Columbia — fighting for liberty with a raised sword, cape, helmet and shield. The second scene is Minerva, the Roman goddess of crafts and wisdom, who is portrayed with helmet and spear pointing to an electrical generator creating power stored in batteries next to a printing press.

The third scene shows Nep­tune, the Roman sea-god, with trident and crown of seaweed riding in a shell chariot drawn by sea horses.

Venus, goddess of love born from the sea, is depicted helping to lay the transatlantic telegraph cable.

In the fourth scene is Mercury, the Roman god of commerce, with his winged petasos and sandals and a caduceus. He is depicted giving a bag of gold to American Revolutionary War financier Robert Morris. In the fifth scene: Vulcan, the Roman god of fire and the forge, is depicted standing at an anvil with his foot on a cannon next to a pile of cannonballs.

The last scene shows Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture, with a wreath of wheat and a cornucopia, symbol of plenty, while sitting on a McCormick mechanical reaper, while the goddess Flora gathers flowers in the foreground.

The Washington Monument is a Pagan Egyptian obelisk. It is based on this ancient Egyptian design that debuted about 4,400 years ago. Its construction took place in two major phases, 1848 to 1856, and 1876 to 1884.

A lack of funds, political turmoil (Know-Nothings, political party) and uncertainty about the survival of the American Union caused the hiatus.

It may be that this opposition was generated by Christian “extremists” who understood the symbolism of the obelisk and the occult character of the secret society, which financed its construction.

James Merett

Comments

taxslave 4 years, 10 months ago

Excellent. Thanks for taking the time to educate and bringing light to darkness.

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als362 4 years, 10 months ago

The more I read what Mr. Merett has written. The more I believe that he and his writtings are both in the dark.

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Harlan 4 years, 10 months ago

Outstanding letter. Appreciate the information. It looks like there is a real mixed bag of spiritual belief. Just as it should be. Nice to know this was part of our founding.

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bock777 4 years, 10 months ago

Perhaps I'm not as well-versed in myth as I thought, but aren't Athena and Mars resepctively Greek and Roman, not Pagan?

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GreyStone 4 years, 10 months ago

“Paganism (from Latin paganus, meaning "country dweller", "rustic") is a blanket term used to refer to various polytheistic, non Abrahamic religious traditions. Its exact definition may vary: It is primarily used in a historical context, referring to Greco-Roman polytheism as well as the polytheistic traditions of Europe before Christianization.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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bock777 4 years, 10 months ago

Interesting, GreyStone. That does make sense, but I'm still unclear as to why he specifies all the other gods and goddesses as Roman and Athena and Mars specifically as pagan. Doesn't bother me, but is it a typo on the author's part?

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jamcolo 4 years, 10 months ago

als362

Write to the paper prove what I wrote is wrong.

Our Justice system also derived from Pagan Greek and Roman concepts. Courthouses throughout America honor our Goddess of Justice with magnificent statues.

The Spirit of Justice statute (also referred to as Minnie Lou) stands in the Great Hall of the Justice department building.

She also represents the Goddess of Justice in Art Deco style. Unfortunately, John Ashcroft (a right-wing Christian) felt offended by her naked metal breasts so he had the statue covered, thus insulting American Pagans countrywide.

Christians want you to believe that, somehow, Moses and the tablets on the Supreme Court building represents proof that U.S. laws derived from the Ten Commandments. Nothing could stand further from the truth.

In the first place, Moses does not sit alone on the Supreme Court Frieze. Christians don't want you to know that Moses sits next to two Pagans-- Confucius and Solon.

Notorious pagans such as Hammurabi, Menes, Lycurgus, Draco, Augustus, and Justinian also appear among the lawgivers. Even Mohammed holding the Koran appears on the building! (Can you imagine the uproar that would occur if U.S. Muslims declared that Constitutional law derived from Allah and the Holy Koran?

Also in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court building, one will find our beloved Pagan Gods and Goddesses (Minerva, Zeus, Mercury, and Juno). Not a single Judeo-Christian God appears anywhere.

The main entrance to the Supreme Court, Moses does not appear there at all. Instead, we see on the main door, relief panels that depict Pagan reflections such as the Shield of Achilles, the Justinian Code, the Magna Carta.

I don't know what to tell ya. Our Forefathers were smart men that knew that if any one faith ruled that all would be forced to live by that faiths rules.

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jamcolo 4 years, 10 months ago

PAGAN: By the fifth century CE, its meaning evolved to include all non-Christians deities.

This is the definition I was thinking of when I used the word "pagan". Sorry for the confusion.

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jamcolo 4 years, 9 months ago

McGruber,

Real history beats any movie of fiction.

I liked Nicolas Cage in The Rock.

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