Photographer Yuri Chicovsky, left, discusses his work Saturday night with Bonnie Villard, center, and Sandy Orgoglioso at Carelli’s Pizzeria and Pasta. The 15th annual Art Walk on Saturday included the artwork of 16 local artists, as well as live music, handmade pottery and chocolate makers exhibiting their talent at various downtown businesses.

Photo by Michelle Balleck

Photographer Yuri Chicovsky, left, discusses his work Saturday night with Bonnie Villard, center, and Sandy Orgoglioso at Carelli’s Pizzeria and Pasta. The 15th annual Art Walk on Saturday included the artwork of 16 local artists, as well as live music, handmade pottery and chocolate makers exhibiting their talent at various downtown businesses.

15th annual Art Walk showcases various talents of local artists

It took Deborah Behringer 12 hours to sew the Earth.

The blue and green quilt, which hung on a bookshelf in Downtown Books & Beads on Saturday night, depicted the entire world with different colors and fabric textures representing each of the continents.

“You know that picture of the Earth from space?” Behringer said, as she looked at her quilt. “I love that picture. It’s beautiful, and I just love global thinking. I like earthy things, earth colors and anything from nature.”

Behringer, who named her art business Blue Planet Art, was one of 16 artists displaying their work at the 15th annual Art Walk and fourth annual Taste of Chocolate on Saturday in downtown Craig.

Yampa Avenue was lit up with the glowing lights of downtown businesses, as live music drifted out of open doors.

Exhibits ranged from quilts to oil and watercolor paintings, and from woodworking to photography, among others.

All were works from local artists, who were grateful for the opportunity to emerge from their studios and display their passion for creativity.

Some were lifelong artists who had practiced their craft as long as they can remember. Behringer only recently had been driven to find the creativity that she said is inside everyone.

“I’m not sure everybody finds it,” she said. “I think a lot of people think that creativity is just art. But you can be creative in the way you raise a child or decorate your home. There’s a lot of creativity people just don’t think about. They have it, but they just don’t know it yet.”

Jerry Gray, who was participating in his first Art Walk, found his creative outlet in wood shops class at Moffat County High School.

He made benches, jewelry boxes, toy chests and anything else he could think of.

However, it wasn’t until he got his first scroll saw that he turned a hobby into a passion and a business.

In less than two hours with the power tool, Gray creates intricate carvings of the things he loves most: trout and big-game animals.

“It’s great, I like it,” Gray said about his first Art Walk. “I’m having fun, and it’s a good way to get my work out there.”

As he stood smiling behind a table of his carvings Saturday in Serendipity Café and Coffee Shop, the front door jingled as a couple walked through.

The man who entered turned to Gray’s table with a twinkle in his eye.

“Hey, where’d you learn all that woodworking?” he asked.

Gray beamed and shook hands with Craig Conrad, his former wood shop teacher from high school.

“He did good,” Conrad said. “Just look at him. And he was a straight A student.”

Gray then reached for one of his carvings and handed it over to Conrad.

“Here, I made this for you,” he said. “Take it.”

It was a beaver with the words, “Got Wood?” carved next to it.

Conrad laughed, and the two shook hands once more.

Event co-organizer Kandee Dilldine, owner of KS Cre­ations, said the social exchange between the former student and teacher is typical of the encounters Art Walk is all about.

As she poured caramel over her Taste of Chocolate creation — chocolate tort with caramel sauce — she said Art Walk was a great success.

Dilldine was one of 16 chocolatiers also featured at local businesses during Art Walk, as part of the Taste of Chocolate. She handed out 100 samples to guests, who then voted on their favorites.

Although the winners won’t be announced until today, Dilldine said she thinks everyone enjoyed an evening of exploring expressive arts.

“You can see that it’s not like walking into a museum,” she said. “There’s just lot of people walking around with smiles on their faces. And there’s chocolate.”

Nicole Inglis can be reached at 875-1793, or ninglis@craigdailypress.com.

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