Diversified Consulting Solutions plans to build a residential subdivision on this land south of Moffat County High School. Construction is expected to begin next spring, and the first building phase will include eight single-family homes.

Photo by Shawn McHugh

Diversified Consulting Solutions plans to build a residential subdivision on this land south of Moffat County High School. Construction is expected to begin next spring, and the first building phase will include eight single-family homes.

Preliminary subdivision plat OK'd by council

— After the Craig City Council approved the Hillside Subdivision preliminary plat, 7-0, Tuesday, the project is one small step closer to fruition.

John Sattler, project engineer for Diversified Consulting Solutions, which owns and will develop the project, said the preliminary plat was the first stage in the timeline.

"We're excited," Sattler said. "The project is moving toward construction, and come spring, hopefully we will be building some homes."

The next stage in the project will be the final plat process, which will create the individual lots. Sattler said the final plat would go before the council after the first of the year.

The project will be built in three phases, with a maximum of 100 developed lots.

The first construction phase will include eight lots along Ninth Street across from Moffat County High School, but no definite timetable has been set for completion or construction.

Sattler said the first homes would be single-family residences with "traditional architecture."

"We'll be building a good solid product, which we hope to be an affordable price for Craig," he said.

That price is expected to be in the mid-$200,000 range, Sattler added.

The Hillside project has been able to move forward with the project while other similar projects in the area have stalled because the land already has existing infrastructure, said Dan Giroux, a partner with Sattler in Diversified Consulting.

"It is a piece of property we liked in the beginning because it's infill property," Giroux said. "It's already annexed into the city, already zoned, has existing utilities and streets, and we can move along in bite-size pieces. That's a big benefit and advantage for us and the community."

Other properties that have come before the city needed to build their own infrastructure at additional cost to developers, he added.

"Some of the other projects were looking to take pretty big bites with offsite utilities and regional or large-scale street improvements," Giroux said. "Were very ambitious in that regard because we'll be able to take baby steps and have the market get a sense of our homes and prices."

Sattler said Diversified Consulting Services did its research when designing the project.

"I think we really qualified this project well," he said. "I don't think it has as much to say about things we've done well as much as things folks haven't done so well."

Giroux said he and Sattler plan to proceed through the building phases somewhat slowly, which will help the project adapt to the local housing market and community needs.

"We like infill projects because they give us a nice, reasonable way to move ahead, and economically, they make sense," he said. "It's a good thing for developers and for the community. It allows us to turn out a nice product and have attractive pricing."

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