Shirley Simpson: Meth takes on anyone willing

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Editor's note: Throughout the week, the Craig Daily Press will be publishing short pieces from people participating in Communities Overcoming Meth Abuse. The pieces are designed to raise awareness about "Not Even Once" Week, an anti-meth educational outreach campaign that runs Oct. 26 through 29 in Craig.

I became involved with Communities Overcoming Meth Abuse at its inception five years ago, along with other friends, law enforcement officers and members of the community who saw meth tearing apart this town.

When a family member became involved in the deadly life of meth it became one of the most devastating times in my life.

I watched as it slowly tore apart the lives of my family and the lives of other families. Meth had no boundaries when it took part in these people's lives.

It doesn't care what your background is, your social status or your financial wealth or lack thereof.

It takes on anyone willing to open that door. We knew something had to be done.

So, this small group of people took on the task of trying to educate the community on the dangers of this horrible drug.

We didn't even know where to begin, but here we are five years later, and we've done countless presentations to businesses, schools, civic organizations and anyone else who wants to listen.

We have changed city ordinances to curb how drugs are sold that are used to manufacture meth, supported our local drug court, and we continually try to provide the most updated information we can about how meth effects our community as a whole.

All of us involved with COMA now, and those who were involved in the past, volunteer countless hours for the betterment of others.

We are pleased to partner with the Colorado Meth Project and their "Not Even Once" campaign.

We have seen success stories in our community, those who battled this drug and won and have gone on to lead wonderful lives. All of them will tell the same story: It was never worth it, not even once.

There are those who still think that the billboards, TV commercials and posters are too graphic and not realistic.

They couldn't be more wrong.

Talk to someone who has been there, and you will find they don't even scratch the surface of the hell meth puts people through. If anything we do can save even one family, one child, one life, then we have accomplished a great deal.

- Submitted by Shirley Simpson, COMA Activities Coordinator

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