Buster, a Bay Tobiano Stallion, was named a world champion in the junior steer stopping division at the American Paint Horse Association's 2009 Summer World Championship, June 24 through July 4 in Fort Worth, Texas. Craig residents Ron and Marie Kettle own the horse, which is shown above with Nick and Chelsea Pullara, who were his trainers.

Ron and Marie Kettle/Courtesy

Buster, a Bay Tobiano Stallion, was named a world champion in the junior steer stopping division at the American Paint Horse Association's 2009 Summer World Championship, June 24 through July 4 in Fort Worth, Texas. Craig residents Ron and Marie Kettle own the horse, which is shown above with Nick and Chelsea Pullara, who were his trainers.

Buster becomes world champion

His registered name is Rolex Bar Twister, but his owners, Craig resident Ronald and Marie Kettle, call him "Buster."

That's his barn name.

Buster is a 4-year-old Bay Tobiano Stallion, and he was recently named an American Paint Horse Association World Champion.

It happened during competition at the 2009 Summer World Championship Paint Horse Show from June 24 through July 4 in Fort Worth. There are two World Championship Paint Horse Shows per year, and the events showcase the talents of American Paint Horses and their owners.

According to a news release from the APHA, this year's Summer World Show, hosted at the Will Rogers Memorial Center, consisted of 690 horses and nearly 1,900 entries.

Exhibitors competed for prizes and cash payments, totaling $300,00.

A full lineup of World Championship Youth events took place at the Summer World Show in conjunction with a select number of amateur and open classes. The amateur and open classes included cutting, sorting, reining, roping, working cow horse and team penning.

Exhibitors who win a World Championship claim the title of being the best paint horse and rider team in a certain event.

Open competitors may be youths, amateurs or program trainers, and they can compete on their own horses or those owned by another individual.

Nick Pullara, of Penrose, rode Buster in the junior steer stopping competition. In this class, horses are judged on their manners while standing behind a barrier, keeping pace with a running steer and positioning their riders for a successful catch, then turning the steer to face, once the animal is roped.

The Kettles' 4-year-old stallion bested a field of 21 horses to become World Champion in junior steer stopping.

But, that's not all.

He also won Reserve World Champion in junior heeling with rider Jay Wadhams, of Pueblo. The Kettles were presented with two belt buckles and two jackets.

In addition, Buster is in the Registry of Merits for heading, heeling and steer stopping. And, as of July 31, he has received the following APHA Honor Roll awards: No. 1 honor roll junior heading, No. 2 honor roll junior heeling, No. 4 honor roll junior steer stopping, No. 3 open honor roll heading, and No. 3 open honor roll heeling.

Buster has been in competition at the National Western Stock Show and Colorado State Fair, too. He was the 2009 National Western Stock Show junior heading champion. At the 2009 State Fair, Buster received two first-place awards in heading, a third place in heeling, and a second and third in steer stopping.

The Paint Horse business began for the Kettles in September 1993, when they bought a paint mare from Tom and Sandy Waite, of Hotchkiss. She delivered a paint stallion foal, Uncompahgre Kidd, in January 1994.

"That's what started it," Marie said. "And we went from there."

So over the years, the Kettles have developed a group of paint brood mares which produce one to four foals a year.

"We raise the foals until they're ready to be trained," Ron said. "Then we turn them over to Nick and Chelsea Pullara."

Pullara Performance Horses is in Penrose.

Marie said the horses are ridden a year before they compete.

The Kettles register their paint horses with the APHA.

The Kettles wished to thank Nick and Chelsey Pullara for outstanding training and showing of Buster and to Joni Voloshin for the stallion.

Copyright Diane Prather, 2009.

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