New Year’s resolutions for 2010

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Consider these scenarios.

Last September, a rancher had to keep putting his cattle back in the summer pasture where they belonged.

He suspected that they were crawling out through a hole in a creek crossing, but he never found the hole. The rancher vows to find the hole during spring fence repair.

A lady takes her gardening seriously, so she’s puzzled as to why her potatoes didn’t grow very large during the summer. Maybe the garden needs more fertilizer or maybe less. She resolves to figure it out next spring.

Last year, during Dec­ember, some weaner calves spent nights asleep in a ranch corral shed.

Fertilizer built up in the shed and froze, requiring a bar to break it loose. The rancher thought, “Never again. Next year I’m going to get into a daily cleaning schedule for the corral sheds.”

Isn’t it wonderful that there’s always another year?

When 2010 rolls around in a few days, we’ll get a chance to remember the resolutions we intend to keep in the New Year.

Can you identify with the following resolutions?

• To put winter tires on the car before the roads start getting slick.

• To stock up on grain and dog and cat food when the forecast calls for a 30 percent chance of snow.

• To put away the summer’s flower pots away before the snow begins to fall.

• To rescue some of the chokecherry crop from the robins and make jelly.

• To pound a metal post for the birdfeeder into the ground before the soil freezes.

• To be extra vigilant in keeping the barn cats from sneaking into the shop when opening the door.

• To make a schedule for cleaning the fertilizer from the corral sheds and follow the schedule religiously.

• To allow enough time to fill the crock pot in the mornings.

To get into a schedule for doing household chores so the dust doesn’t get an inch thick.

• To order enough hay to last until spring.

• To buy plenty of vacuum cleaner bags.

• To start Christmas shopping in September.

• To start working on income taxes before April 1.

• To purchase colostrum, vaccines, and other calving supplies well in advance of calving season.

• To not put hay right in the corral gate because it causes a build-up, and when it snows you can’t get the gate open.

• To become more computer-literate.

• To put Christmas decorations up early, even if it’s 70 degrees outdoors.

• To order garden seeds before May 1.

• To purchase Christmas decorations, paper, trims and cards during the after-Christmas sales.

• To clean the junk out of the storage shed.

• To paint the house.

• To sell that old cow that, each spring, gets a sore udder and kicks her calf.

• To transplant the iris and tulip bulbs.

• To put the Halloween decorations away before Christmas.

• To put the Christmas decorations away before Valentine’s Day.

• To avoid “It will do for now” repairs.

• To remember to carry a roll of toilet tissue in the ranch pickup truck.

• To not leave a gate open because “I’ll be right back.”

• To watch the water tank so it doesn’t overflow.

• To drain the garden hose well in the winter.

• To take time to visit that friend as you promised you would.

• To always pack water and lunch with you when going off to check cows and the grandchildren are with you.

Isn’t it wonderful to have another year?

Happy New Year, everyone.

Copyright Diane Prather, 2009.

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