Our View: Fear and living

— Ambrose Redmoon once wrote, "Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear."

Six years and one day after Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack, this saying seems to be proving true year by year, if not day by day.

Remember back to the hours, days and months after the attack? The country was at heightened state of alert. Fear of the mail, fear of going to big events, fear of anytime a plane seemed to be flying too close to a city.

We had security codes go up and down the color spectrum, and we have a new government agency to help deal with the threat.

But as time went along, the mood changed. The public's fear of a terrorist attack seems to be diminishing.

We have gone on with our lives.

And that is a good thing.

That we are living our lives with scarcely a worry about terrorism points out this truth: The net effect of what those 19 terrorist cowards had hoped to do - spread terror in the U.S. - by crashing the three planes failed.

Though we have not captured Osama bin Laden, do not think his plan worked. The reality is this: He lives in a cave, hiding from us. He is the one living in fear, and like a coward sends out others to do his bidding.

How many of us feel fear based on the events that took place on Sept. 11, 2001? That is unknown, but it is more than likely very few of us have changed our personal lives based on this threat.

Even how we react to that terrible day six years ago has changed.

There are fewer yearly memorials being conducted, the mention of the attacks are less frequent, and we are seemingly more fearful that our beloved soldiers may not return alive from Iraq than we are about another attack on U.S. soil.

Fear has been pushed aside.

Living life has taken its place.

But through it, we still cannot forget this day or what we lost - 2,974 innocent lives and the tragedy that their loved ones endured.

Of all the things we cannot remember, and of all the things we cannot forget, we cannot forget Sept. 11.

We must honor those who died in a cowardly attack.

We must honor those who fight such cowards.

We must look at the world stage in a different light.

But what we must not do is give up our way of life. We must remember that there are things more important than fear.

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