Hearts, glitter and doilies

Craig students busy making Valentines

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Young students in Craig schools have been busy this week gluing red doilies to paper plates and decorating paper bags with hearts and glitter.

It's preparation for Tuesday, when their makeshift "mail-boxes will be filled with Valentine's Day cards and candy.

According to church tradition St. Valentine was a priest near Rome in about 270 A.D. At that time, Roman Emperor Claudius II had issued an edict forbidding marriage because he thought married men were more emotionally attached to their families, and thus, did not make good soldiers. So to assure quality soldiers, he banned marriage.

Valentine, a bishop, seeing the trauma of young lovers, met them in a secret place and joined them in the sacrament of matrimony. Claudius learned of this "friend of lovers," and had him arrested.

On Feb. 24, 270, Valentine was executed.

While Valentine was in prison awaiting his fate, he came in contact with his jailor, Asterius. The jailor had a blind daughter. Asterius requested him to heal his daughter. Valentine miraculously restored the sight of Asterius' daughter. Just before his execution, Valentine asked for a pen and paper from his jailor, and signed a farewell message to her "From Your Valentine," a phrase that lived ever after.

Valentine thus became a patron saint and spiritual overseer of an annual festival. The festival involved young Romans offering women they admired, and wished to court, handwritten greetings of affection on Feb. 14.

-- Daily Press

For some parents, the weekend will be spent baking cupcakes or helping their little ones sort through cards for their friends.

Valentine's Day seems to touch mainly young students and adults.

Teens don't put as much stock in the holiday, said Moffat County High School Principal Jane Krogman.

"There are pockets of kids who do something special, but not a lot," she said.

Last year, the high school banned flower deliveries to students.

"It got so out of control," Krogman said. "We set up extra tables in the office on Valentine's Day and the secretaries did nothing but deliver flowers."

For some students, flowers are being replaced by candy. The student council is selling "Crush Pops," lollypops that students can have sent to one another during the last period of the day Tuesday.

But, that likely will be the only sign of celebration.

High school senior Kaylin Lamerton said Valentine's Day isn't really a big deal at the high school.

That's not the case at Craig's elementary schools, which are all gearing up for their Valentine's Day parties.

Seven-year-old Damen Hart said he's been making Valentines and all kinds of things, but he's not exactly sure what the point is.

"I don't know what Valentine's Day is about. Friends?" he said.

Alex Hamilton, 7, has a better grasp of the holiday's meaning.

"It's about loving and caring for others," she said. "I learned that from my mom and my dad."

Feb. 14 is a day for presents at Hamilton's house -- mostly stuffed animals with big hearts, she said.

"Sometimes I just get a card that says 'I love you, Alex," she said.

All the classes at East Elementary School will have afternoon parties, but fourth-grade teacher Linda Mosher is going to break the traditional candy and cards exchange.

Her class will have a candlelight lunch.

The menu?

"Corn dogs, and all the things that go with them," she said.

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