Gene Adamek: Writing on the wall

Editor's note: On Nov. 2, voters rejected 1B, which asked for a tax increase that would have benefited Horizons Specialized Services, a nonprofit group offering services for people with mental retardation.

To the editor:

Your newspaper's recent endorsement of Referendum 1B apparently didn't have much effect on the voters of Moffat County.

The focus of my letter is not about the amendment itself, rather, the admonition your writer included about 1B was a point well made.

I'm paraphrasing, but your column implied that judgment can occur from outside ourselves, if we withhold help and justice from those in need. Some people call this force "karma," the Arabs call it "kismet" and others simply say, "You will reap what you sow." With this said, I will tell you a short story.

Centuries ago, a powerful king ruled over the land of present-day Iraq. He and his father before him had received "mixed reviews," from the Lord over the years, but things had finally reached the tipping point.

The king was astonished when a single hand suddenly appeared and began writing a strange message on the palace wall. In smooth, quick strokes, a finger wrote, "Mene, mene, tekel, upharsin."

The king was so shaken that his bones began to rattle inside of his body. Since he could not read the writing, he immediately called for his stargazers and wise men to translate the words. Alas, none of his people could read the writing on the wall.

A search began throughout the kingdom until a holy hacker dude named Daniel was found to interpret the message. Daniel appeared before the King and said, "I have some good news, and I have some bad news." (Not really). What he did say was far worse. Daniel said to the king, "God has numbered the days of your reign and brought it to an end. You have been weighed in the balance and found wanting."

Haunting words for the poor, frightened king. That very night, his life was taken from him and his kingdom divided among his enemies.

It seems along the way, the king and his people started worshipping the gods of silver and gold and wood and stone. Worse yet, the king decided to set his face against the Lord of Heaven. Bad choice, Vern.

At any rate, kingdoms come and go. History is littered with countries that said to themselves, "I am, and there is no other." The former Soviet Union rose to power like no other, all the while exalting evolution, humanism and atheism as their primary teachings. Schools in the Soviet Union were prohibited from teaching anything to the contrary, and the demise of the Soviet Union was a mere 70 years away.

Many years ago, Abraham Lincoln reminded us that we have been blessed as a nation, but he also warned that we were in danger of "forgetting God." I think the occasion was Thanksgiving.

Gene Adamek

Craig

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