Our View: Thank you

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Event planning in Moffat County can be challenging at best. Volunteers are hard to come by, funding is even harder to gather, and predicting the weather is impossible. Yet year after year, several local organizations manage to make their events happen, rain or shine, regardless of how many people are there to help. Moffat County residents can and should be proud of the grass-roots efforts that happen annually to revive old traditions and to introduce an element of change with each new event.

Whittle the Wood Rendezvous has grown to be one of the most popular events all summer. Camaraderie, great music, food, vendors and a little friendly competition make this event something to talk about no matter where you live. The city of Craig turned a problematic tree situation into an event that the community looks forward to every year, knowing the next year is sure to be even better than the last.

The Ride-N-Tie Rodeo was all but over after 58 years. New leadership, new vision and support from the old crew made possible a family event that turned a profit for the first time in many years. The event drew more than 250 competitors from across the nation and counted more than 650 spectators each night. Not only did Amanda Schneider and Belinda Wyman work tirelessly to revive the event, but they added crowd-pleasing bullfighting for the first year.

Grand Olde West Days isn't affectionately referred to as "Wet Days" for nothing, but the show went on regardless of the rain. It must be difficult for an entire group of volunteers to get excited about an event that they know will likely be rainy, chilly and messy. Not only do they continue to get excited, they work harder each year to bring better vendors, more music and to improve their event. Although we don't anticipate that the weather will ever be any better, we do know that the event will continue to grow.

There are many more events that take place in Craig and Moffat County each year that are worthy of praise, but we applaud the summer events that have grown in popularity and continue to grow despite the challenges they face.

It's events like these that draw visitors who spend money and give locals another reason to be proud of the community in which they live.

Thanks to those people who work tirelessly to ensure these events continue year after year and grow year after year. They get nothing from it but the satisfaction of knowing they contributed.

Those people are what make a good community great.

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