Speaker calls to Christians

Bob Frey urges end of evolution in schools, 'lying to kids'

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Bob Frey of Minnesota is calling Craig residents to action, urging them to petition educators and legislators to end teaching of evolution in public schools.

"We are lying to kids," Frey said Sunday during a presentation at Yampa Valley Baptist Church.

Bob Frey also will give presentations at 7 p.m. today and Wednesday at Yampa Valley Baptist Church, 3900 E. Victory Way. He will speak about evolution's effect on education Wednesday.

"We grew up believing these lies," he said. "We need to say something now that we know better."

Frey argues that evolution, which he said is wrongly labeled as a science, is based on faith, just as creation-ism is.

"Don't let anyone tell you one is religion and one is science," Frey said.

Evolution is the biological study of how organisms pass on traits from generation to generation, leading to novel traits and new species. Creationism is the literal interpretation of the Bible and the story of how God created the earth.

Proponents of evolution believe the world is billions of years old, which they say is supported by fossil findings. Creationists believe the world is just a few thousand years old and was designed and created by a supreme being.

To support his argument, Frey argues that fossil-dating methods include assumptions that lead to incorrect answers. Frey presented photos of present-day trilobites, or marine animals, that scientists say existed 5 million to 6 million years ago.

Frey said the sun is shrinking at a rate of five feet in diameter per hour. If scientific calculations are correct, the sun would have touched the earth 11 million years ago, he said. "That would have been pretty hard on the dinosaurs, don't you think?" he said.

Audience members chuckled when Frey presented his textbook evidence about the big-bang theory, which asserts that the universe began with the explosion of an atom and has been expanding since.

"Have you ever seen nothing explode?" he said. "Everything came from nothing -- this is what we're teaching kids in science class."

John Manley of Hayden, who has attended the church for a year, said he thinks the idea that the world came from nothing is something on which creationists and scientists agree. Either nothing exploded or God created the world from nothingness.

Frey addressed that concept at the start of his speech. He said there are two choices for a "worldview," or how the earth came to be -- either somebody made the world or the world made itself.

Since 1963, public schools have taught the latter, Frey said.

"Folks, this is a lie and we're paying for it through tax dollars for our kids," Frey said.

He said evolution in education has led to an increase in teen pregnancy, higher abortion rates and more teen suicides. He also said violent crime and divorces have skyrocketed and standardized test scores have dropped because evolution is taught in schools.

Without God, youths have no accountability and no one to answer to, he said.

"If it feels good, do it," Frey said.

Manley said he was concerned about what Frey said was a correlation between teaching evolution and societal problems.

"America is going down a dangerous path," he said.

Roger Spears, a teacher at Moffat County High School, has taught science for 15 years. He teaches evolution because the state mandates its inclusion and students are tested on the subject.

"Whether they agree upon it or not, they need to be exposed to it to be accountable for it," Spears said.

Spears, who did not attend Frey's presentation, declined to comment specifically about it.

But he said there is evidence of "micro-evolution," such as mosquitoes developing immunities to insecticides.

Spears said he personally believes, at least partially, in both creationism and evolution.

Frey said this theory, referred to as "intelligent design," asserts the idea that God created the world and creatures evolved. Frey said he doesn't subscribe to the theory, and he urges Christians to fight to remove evolution from curriculums.

Manley said he would love to see students allowed to study their Bibles in public schools and hopes Frey's presentation is a push in that direction.

"He's got an important message, and he's getting it out," Manley said. "I would hope it would cause Christians to do something to save this country."

For information on Frey's presentations, call 824-5424 or visit www.creationscienceseminars.org.

Michelle Perry can be reached at 824-7031, ext. 209, or mperry@craigdailypress.com.

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