Club continues fund-raise for commemoration

The High Plains Mustang Club wants to commemorate the mustangs while the horses still have herds roaming parts of Colorado.

"They are a part of the history of this area -- I'm not sure they will be around here forever," club member Linda Booker said.

Booker said there are four herds of mustangs in Colorado. The herds are located at Plantz Creek, Douglas Mountain and in the Sand Wash area.

The project idea was started by members of the High Plains Mustang and the Community Foundation of Northwest Colorado's board of directors whose members are discussing ways to share and promote the uniqueness of northwestern Colorado.

Together, the community foundation and club began to create the "Spirit of Sand Wash" Mustang Project.

The club's intention for the project is to "celebrate the majesty of the wild horses and the West, which our community so closely

identifies with."

Booker said she participates in the project because she was a past owner of a mustang and wants to see the horses recognized long before they vanish from the landscape of Colorado. She said she fears the changes in climate and the drought conditions might make it hard for the horses to survive.

The club is currently raising funds to have a life-size sculpture of mustang horses made and placed in a park in Craig. Members hope to have six horses in the sculpture, including two stallions, foals and mares.

To assist in raising money for the commemoration, club members are selling the mantle-sized sculpture, "Spirit of the Sand Wash," by artist Curtis Zabel. Booker said the sculptures cost $2,500 and $1,700 will go to pay for the expenses of the park. In order to make the life-size sculpture, members need to sell 45 sculptures.

"We're moving along," Booker said on the project.

The land for the park was donated by John and Beverly Ricks of Steamboat Springs and is located at the west end of Craig.

"We need the support of sponsors with a commitment to the cultural life of our community, with pride in its vitality, with sensitivity to the wild horse as a symbol of our western heritage," members stated.

People who are interested can view the mantle-size sculpture at On the Shelf bookstore in Craig.

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