Tournament leaves most tickled pink

Philanthropists raise $1,367 for cancer awareness, research

It was easy to tell Wednesday who was at the Yampa Valley Golf Course for the Rally for a Cure golf tournament -- they were almost all in pink. To go along with the color theme, tournament organizers were tickled pink about how the day went.

"Everything went perfectly," said co-chairwoman Susan Utzinger. "We had a great response and increased participation."

Thirty-five golfers attended the tournament, an increase from 24 last year. In addition, they raised $570 for the Rally for a Cure and $797 for the Moffat County Cancer Society, a total of $1,367. Last year, the tournament raised a total of $1,026.50.

"Everybody comes out a winner in this tournament," said participant Gwen Parker. "Ladies who have never played came out and were able to enjoy themselves."

Besides the "everybody-is-a-winner" attitude, there were actual winners crowned in the four-person scramble format. Two teams tied for first with a score of 75. Co-champions were the group of Susan Nicholson, Kathy Burke, Karen Rohnke and Susan Gregg along with the foursome of Brenda Burke, Beth Cooney, Rose Hutton and Joann Stoddard.

In the closest-to-pin competition, eight golfers were able to keep their shots on the green. They were Lena Anson, Sandi Seip, Dana Filkoski, Mary Beth Pyle, Phyllis Virden, Mary Jane Montoya, Karen Rohnke and Pam Horn. Those eight received a white Titleist golf ball with the pink cancer ribbon insignia. Mary Jane Montoya was the closest to the pin, winning a Nancy Lopez nine wood in addition to the ball.

Other than the golf, the focus of the day was cancer awareness. At least six cancer survivors played in the tournament and the members of the Yampa Valley Ladies Golf Association have lost several members to the disease.

"Everybody thinks of someone who has had cancer," Virden said. "It was good weather, with good friends and helping a good cause."

Looking ahead to next year, the ladies said they hoped they could increase participation.

"Maybe we could get businesses to sponsor holes," said Sandy Seip. "That would be nice, if they're out there listening."

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