Scores improve, but not by much

Fourth-graders improve in reading, writing

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In terms of reading and writing, Moffat County fourth graders are right at state average, but seventh graders are below it, according to the latest Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) results.

Statewide, writing scores remain low for both classes.

The results were released Wednesday.

Results of the 2000 reading and writing assessments show the number of fourth-grade students across the state scoring proficient or advanced in reading increased from 59 percent to 62 percent. In writing, fourth-graders' scores increased from 34 percent to 36 percent. Seventh-grade reading scores increased from 56 percent to 58 percent and seventh-grade writing increased from 41 percent to 42 percent.

"However positive we may feel about the directions at this time, it must not distract us from the fact that we still have a long way to go," said Clair Orr, Colorado State Board of Education Chairman. "Now is not the time to rest on our laurels, but rather to redouble our efforts."

In Moffat County, 64 percent of fourth graders scored proficient or advanced in reading, and 35 percent scored proficient or advanced in writing.

For area seventh graders, 50 percent scored proficient or advanced in reading while 31 percent scored proficient or advanced in writing

Statewide, these results show that nearly 35 percent, or 19,693, of fourth grade students cannot read at grade level.

On the writing portion, 36 percent of fourth graders in Colorado scored proficient or advanced. This means nearly 32,749 students cannot write at a proficient level.

Statewide, results for seventh-grade reading show that 58 percent of students passed with scores of proficient or advanced. Nearly 20,646 students, or 42 percent of seventh graders in the state, do not read at grade level.

In seventh-grade writing, the results show that 42 percent of students passed with scores of proficient or advanced. This means that nearly 27,575 seventh graders in Colorado cannot write at a proficient level.

State officials stress the importance of CSAP scores. Beginning next spring, schools will receive report cards. Portions of the overall school grades will be based on CSAP scores.

"It is increasingly clear we know what works," Orr said. "We also must be accountable for making what works known to more schools and teachers."

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